Hello {!firstname},

Astronomer Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto back in 1930, at the ripe old age of 24.

He passed away in 1998. He was 90 years old.

       Now when the astronomical union a few years ago decided to demote Pluto to a minor planet,
I'm sure Tombaugh might have been rolling over in his grave.

   However today, he is flying high.

With the New Horizons flyby mission, which will come within 12,500 km of the cold, icy Planet.

Some of his ashes were put in a canister about two inches wide and half-an-inch tall that was attached to the inside of the  spacecraft's upper deck.

Here is a copy of the inscription:

"Interned herein are remains of American Clyde W. Tombaugh, discoverer of Pluto and the solar system's "third zone." Adelle and Muron's boy, Patricia's husband, Annette and Alden's father, astronomer, teacher, punster, and friend: Clyde W. Tombaugh (1906-1997)."

   Thanks to Clyde Tombaugh, today we have an even greater understanding of what might lie beyond the Solar System.

Brilliant man.

  Brilliant discovery.

And we amateur astronomers are very fortunate today.

We can also make similar discoveries with equipment that is far better than Tombaugh ever had access too in his day.

For example: Celestron CCD Imaging cameras

http://khanscope.com/newEquipList.cfm?catID=1&subCatID=18&manID=2

      Several of the best models are on sale right now.

And the entry level costs start at only $111.

Hard to believe.

Clear Skies,

Ray Khan