Hello {!firstname},

Well I'm happy to say that the first Loon's have arrived here on Manitoulin Island.

     There is nothing quite like the haunting call of the Canadian Loon, late at night.

If you have never heard it, well words can't really describe it.

     The reference to someone being a "looney" might be due to the sound that the loon
makes. 

It's pretty unusual.

     As for night sky viewing, while I often enjoy using computerized telescopes, on the
odd occassion, I like the peace and quiet (so I can actually hear the Loon), and resort
to using a manual telescope.

One of the tasks I have to do this weekend ,  is collimate my 4" newtonian reflector.

       It's very basic, and on an alt-azimuth mount, however I like it's "grab and go"
accessibility for quick view.

You know, the "Lazy man's way to a quick observing session".

People often ask me, what's the best tool for collimating a reflector?

This is what I personally use and recommend.

http://khanscope.com/accessDetails.cfm?productID=2139

    It's manufactured by my buddy, David Ho of Hotech.  

When it comes to collimation, David is a master.  

Heck, he is show good, he's even collimated the telescope at Mount Palomar.

     Anyway, regardless it's always a good idea to check the collimation of your
telescope early in the season, before you get too busy to think about it.

If you don't want to do it yourself, our technician can also assist
with this through the store

     I'd suggest it's a good skill to learn, and really not that difficult at all.

Especially with the proper tools.

Clear Skies,

Ray Khan

PS  Schmidt-Cassegrain telescopes are also susceptible to alignment issues.
      Refractors less so,  if well constructed as many these days in mid range and top end.