Hello {!firstname},
Well, to yours truly at least.

     The late Clyde Tombaugh.

An avid amateur astronomer himself,
and discoverer of the planet Pluto, at the ripe old age of  24.

     Now, we all know that the International Astronomical Union (IAU)  reclassified Pluto as
a dwarf planet back back in 2006.

    Tombaugh passed away in 1997, so of course he fortunately wouldn't know this.

Regardless of what the IAU thinks of it, every time I observe Pluto,it's still a planet to me
and that's never going to change as far as I am concerned.

    Now some would be astrologer's might be scratching their heads and wondering how this
affect's their charts.

I am sure they will think up something or the other, based on "no science" and more nonsense.

       Something exciting to look forward to this summer is NASA's New Horizons spacecraft
which blasted off in 2006, and will reach closest approach to Pluto on July 14, 2015.

And Clyde Tombaugh will once again be well remembered for his brilliant discovery.{!firstname}.

If you are interested in imaging the solar system (which includes Pluto of course), then you
will be very interested in this great new Neximage burst solar system planetary imager from Celestron.

( http://khanscope.com/productdetails.cfm?productID=5392 )

Clear Skies,

Ray Khan

PS Tombaugh was a self taught amateur astronomer who learned by doing.  It's the best way.