Hello {!firstname},

I'll tell you right off the bat.

The worst telescope is the one does not get used.


And sadly, there are many of these sitting in closets as I write this suffering from neglect.

There are many reasons telescopes don't get used.

Here a just few:

  • Poor Quality and frustrating to use.
  • Too heavy to take out and set-up
  • Broken: either electronic or optical failure
    (or your ex damaged it)
  • Missing parts. Got lost during a move perhaps.
  • Forgotten how to use the instrument.
  • It's out of collimation or optical alignment (more common on SCT's and Newonians/dobosonian's
    less so on refractor types of telescopes.
  • And I'm sure you might have another reason, I might have missed.
    If so, let me know.

Now perhaps you can relate to any or  several of   those problems, {!firstname}

I can offer a few solutions to you, to hopefully get you motivated to using your instrument

First off, if it's poor quality, just get rid of it. 

If it's too heavy for you  then simply trade it in, sell it and get something  more portable, that
will make it easier for you to enjoy the hobby.  Telescopes have gotten better optically and are
far more portable these days, than they ever where.

Missing parts? Well, those can be replaced. We carry a good inventory of replacement parts for
all kinds of telescope brands, and/or our technician can service your instrument.

If you have forgotten how to use your particular telescope, well simply re read the operations manual
for it.  Once you start playing around with it again, the knowledge will come back fairly quickly.

Out of collimation? (optical alignment).    Either collimate the instrument yourself, using the instructions
usually supplied in the operating manual.    Or if you don't want to do that, our technician can do it for you.
I recommend learning how to do it yourself, and you can get tools to assist you with this.
Ask us, if you are not sure, and we can make recommendations, depending on the type of instrument
you have.

Either way, just remember, being an amateur astronomer can be a lifetime hobby and just be patient with
yourself.  Over time, you will be surprised how much knowledge you can gain.

Clear Skies,

Ray Khan