Hello {!firstname},
Imagine you are the famous eighteenth century astronomer, Caroline Herschel.
Yes, the famous sister of none other than William Herschel, who discovered the
planet Uranus.
     She began stargazing on August 22, 1782, and kept a journal of her night
sky studies.
She spent many a night studying the sky, sort of as a hobby.  Pushed into it by her
Caroline learnt the positions of many stars, star clusters and double stars, and so on.
It took perseverance and dedication on here part, but she stuck with it and
as a result, became very familiar with the night sky.
She learnt how to use her telescope throughout the process, and I am sure that
she struggled on some nights.
The key to learning the night sky is just getting out on occasion and looking up,
and trying to identify just one new object. 
Look it up on a  planisphere or  skymap, and make a concerted effort to locate
and find, and identify the object.
Great satisfaction will result, and your continued efforts will pay off handsomely.
Just like they did for Caroline Herschel who assisted her brother in developing
and recording the Herschel Catolog of Stars, double stars,clusters etc.
Now while it's true that with the aid of computerized telescopes today, we can find
and identify objects more rapidly,  Meade Instruments has cleverly also included
audio identification of an object once you do find it, with their "Astronomer Inside"
Yep, once you are on the object,  you can get an audio description of what you are
looking, at, and other fascinating information about distance,size and more.
And their entire LX90 series telescopes,  features this.
We've got them on sale right now, at substantial discounts, and all
models are in stock, ready for immediate delivery.
Here is a link:  http://www.khanscope.com/newEquipList.cfm?catID=1&subCatID=1&manID=1
Just scroll down for the sale prices.
Clear Skies,
Ray Khan
PS  So now you know the secrets: look up, identify, and be consistent.  That's how
      you'll learn the night sky, and it won't take very long.